CANAL WITH AN ANGLER AND TWO SWANS

Rembrandt Van Rijn
CANAL WITH AN ANGLER AND TWO SWANS
etching & drypoint
1650

An original Rembrandt Van Rijn etching & drypoint print.

1650

Original etching and drypoint printed in black ink on laid paper bearing a portion of a Foolscap watermark.

Signed and dated in the plate lower left Rembrandt f. 1650 (the “d” reversed). 

A strong, clear 17th century/lifetime impression of Bartsch, Hind, Biorklund-Barnard, Usticke and New Hollstein’s second and final state of this rare etching (characterized by G.W. Nowell-Usticke in his 1967 catalogue Rembrandt’s Etchings: States and Values as “a rare little landscape,” and assigned his scarcity rating of “RR+” [50-75 impressions extant in that year]), printed after the addition of the diagonal shading to the meadow behind the angler at the right, and the shading to the meadow at the edge of the wood at the left, showing touches of burr on the vertical shading in the water at the center. 

Catalog: Bartsch 235 ii/ii; Hind 238 ii/ii; Biorklund-Barnard 50-A ii/ii; Usticke 235 ii/ii; New Hollstein 253 ii/ii.

3 x 4 inches

In this etching we see depicted in the middle ground one of the country homes of the tax collector Jan Uytenbogaert, the subject of Rembrandt’s portrait etching of 1639 “Jan Uytenbogaert, the Gold-Weigher” (Bartsch 281).  This country home, west of Amsterdam proper is identified as the House with the Tower, even though here the dome and spire which can be seen in two other etchings depicting the house (B. 234, 236) have been removed leaving only the square tower.  Rembrandt has taken somewhat uncharacteristic liberties with the landscape in which the house is positioned.  Nearly all of the artist’s landscapes are records of real views.  However, here he has taken the liberty to add a fantastic mountain view in the background, and the flat Dutch polder scene with fishermen in the foreground.
 
In his 1751-52 catalogue, Gersaint describes this and the following print under the same number in the belief that they were originally part of one plate. 

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