Reflection

Mary Cassatt
Reflection
drypoint
c.1889-90

An original hand-signed Mary Cassatt drypoint print.

c.1889-90

Original drypoint printed in brown/black ink on laid Japan paper

Hand-signed in pencil in the margin lower right Mary Cassatt.

A superb impression of Breeskin’s fourth and final state of this scarce drypoint, richly printed with several touches of burr throughout, printed after the addition of the shading behind the lower edge of the chair, bearing the artist’s monogram stamp (Lugt 604) in blue ink in the lower left corner of the platemark (indicating that the artist personally approved this impression of the definitive state), from the edition of only 25.  One of twelve drypoints, each published in an edition of 25, exhibited in November-December, 1893, in the large, comprehensive exhibition of the artist’s paintings, pastels, drawings, and prints, at the Galerie Durand-Ruel, Paris, and again at Galerie Durand-Ruel, New York in 1895.

Catalog: Breeskin 131 iv/iv.

10 x 6 7/8 inches

Sheet Size: 12 x 9 7/8 inches 

Cassatt’s involvement in Impressionism was not through landscape but through a modern realism.  Her interpretation of light was concentrated on the way it affects the visual appearance of the figure.  In her themes she found a totally personal and unique artistic language.  Her creations are not idealized but depict real women seen in real everyday situations, expressed with a tenderness, sympathy and understanding which has untold depth of insight.  Drawn direct from life the drypoints and etchings are amongst the great masterworks of Impressionist graphic art.
This fine drypoint is one of twelve works in this medium that were exhibited at the Galerie Durand-Ruel in Paris in 1893, along with examples of her paintings, pastels and drawings, as well as prints in other media.  In addition to the twelve drypoints was a series of fourteen fine color prints, thirty-eight other etchings and one lithograph.  Another exhibition was mounted by Durand-Ruel in his New York City gallery in April of 1895.  These were two of the major exhibitions of the artist’s career. 

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