XXIV FESTIVAL D’AVIGNON – PICASSO OEUVRES DE 1969-1970

Pablo Picasso
XXIV FESTIVAL D’AVIGNON – PICASSO OEUVRES DE 1969-1970
Lithograph
1970

An original Pablo Picasso Lithograph print.

1970

Original lithograph poster printed in colors on wove paper.

A superb impression, from the edition of 11,100. Published by the XXIV Festival d’Avignon to advertise an exhibition of paintings and drawings by Picasso from 1969-70 at the Palais du Papes, Avignon; transcribed and printed Henri Deschamps from Picasso’s 1969 oil on plywood at Imprimerie Mourlot, Paris.

Catalog: Rodrigo vol. I no. 195; Czwiklitzer 364.

30 3/4 x 20 3/4 inches

In his 1992 catalogue, Picasso in his Posters: Image and Work, Luis Carlos Rodrigo comments:

In 1970, shortly after the death of Yvonne Zervos, organizer of the splendid exhibition at the Palais des Papes in Avignon, Picasso’s character’s arrived, one hundred and seventy-five oil paintings and fifty-five drawings, which would invade every room and corner, creating a splendid feast of color and gaiety. It was the triumph of art over death.

Picasso completed this incredible work at the age of eight-eight, between January 5, 1969, and February 2, 1970, i.e. at a rate of one painting every fifty-four hours. It meant bringing the past to the present and breaking away once more from the old forms which limited his art, in a way that no other artist had ever done before.

The musketeers stand out amongst these creations: men with feathered hats or hatless, with or without swords, with all forms and styles of moustaches, with strange, savage expressions, charged with history and experience, daring and defiant, dressed in flashing colors, drawn with extraordinarily rapid lines, but who, in spite of the austerity of detail, still retained what was necessary to rise up, fully alive, in a combination of emotion and irony.

The musketeer reproduced here is one of the most outstanding of this series. The chromatism of brilliant other-worldly reds and the flashing golds winding between the black of the hair and the beard and the pallidness of the imposing and daring face, which conserves, with implacable irony, the perverse gaze.

Mastery of color and form which the hand of the Maestro gave us in his final years.

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